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18 Natural Ways To Boost Endorphins Instantly | Healthy Mind - Think Big

Hey there readers! Have you ever noticed that eating chocolate, or playing sports makes you feel great? Endorphins are a big part of the reason why. They’re tiny molecules released by your brain during these activities. Your brain also releases endorphins when you’re in pain or under stress, in an effort to naturally relieve pain. Endorphins trigger the release of another brain chemical, dopamine, which boosts mood. That’s why they are often called ‘Feel-Good’ chemicals. And in today’s post, we will tell you the best ways to boost endorphins naturally. From laughing, smelling lavender, practicing yoga, meditating to gossiping, and more, read till the end to learn about all of them.

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#01. SPEND TIME IN THE SUNSHINE: 

Most of us only need short, regular sunlight exposure to help our bodies synthesize vitamin D. It is needed for the production of brain chemicals such as dopamine. Vitamin D is produced in response to skin being exposed to sunlight. It also occurs naturally in a few foods - including some fish, fish liver oils, and egg yolks - and in fortified dairy and grain products. However, nothing feels better than some time in the sun. How much time do you spend in the sun every day? Tell us quickly down below in the comments section! 

#02. EAT GOOD CARBS: 

Research has found that carbohydrate foods increase our serotonin levels and improve our mood, thereby increasing our happy hormones. The best carbohydrates to eat are low GI, certified organic, and nutritious, such as muffins, sourdough spelled toast, bananas, brown rice, and oats. 

#03. WORK OUT: 

If you've ever heard the term "Runner's High," it's not just a sense of accomplishment one gets from running. The famed "Runner's High" occurs from a run where you might experience a sudden burst of endorphins. This short-lasting, euphoric state happens after intense physical exercise that causes your body to go through a number of changes. As your breathing becomes heavier, your pulse quickens and causes your heart to pump harder which moves oxygenated blood to your muscles and brain. But don't only look to running for that major endorphin boost. Tennis, swimming and HIIT exercises are also great choices. These hormones can help reduce emotional stress, act as a natural anti-inflammatory, relieve pain, and simply result in feeling good. 

#04. LAUGH: 

Many of us have heard the age-old saying that "Laughter is the best medicine." That's because a good laugh can actually trigger the release of endorphins. Since laughter helps us breathe in more oxygen-rich air, we're instantly activating our heart, lungs, and muscles. This stimulates the production of feel-good endorphins. So there you have it: Find ways to laugh every day. 

#05. ACUPUNCTURE: 

Yes, the ancient Chinese medicine technique of acupuncture involves inserting thin needles into the body, and it can actually stimulate the release of endorphins. For centuries, the traditional practice has been used to alleviate a variety of issues, from chronic pain to headaches, to colds and allergies. Studies show that acupuncture can accelerate the release of endorphins, helping you fight off pain,   reduce stress, and create more of those good feelings you crave. It also increases levels of endorphins and decreases norepinephrine, a brain chemical associated with pain. Looking for answers on all the latest health and wellness news? Hit that “Subscribe” button, and join our millions of followers. Stay up to date on all our great Healthy Mind - Think Big content. 

#06. LISTEN TO MUSIC: 

Did you know music can literally make you happy? If you've ever put on your favorite song and instantly felt good, there's science behind that. Research supports music having the power to increase the flow of endorphins. This stimulates feelings of pleasure and reward. But it's not just music itself that can boost endorphins. Creative arts connected to music like singing, dancing, and drumming can also trigger endorphins. All the more reason to dance and sing to your favorite playlist. 

#07. SMELL LAVENDER: 

From stress relief to promoting good sleep, essential oils are seemingly universal in their benefits. But one of the surprising perks of essential oils, particularly lavender, is their ability to boost endorphins. Emerging research points to lavender for the release of endorphins. By calming the mind and body, lavender helps us relax, fall asleep, and cope with stress, among other things. 

#08. GET A MASSAGE: 

We often turn to massages to relax. But not only can this pampering treatment help us unwind, but it can also prompt the release of endorphins. That's because a massage stimulates the entire body, increasing blood circulation and in turn endorphin production. Massage treatment may help alleviate stress and improve symptoms of physical health including chronic pain and tiredness. These advantages are linked to the release of various hormones, including endorphins. 

#09. PRACTICE YOGA: 

Most types of yoga do not fall under aerobic exercise. But the practice’s health and wellness benefits go just as far as improving your state of mind. As a discipline, yoga focuses on breathing, meditation, stretching, and holding postures for short periods of time. All of these forcibly teach you to slow down, easing anxiety and promoting mental relaxation. By holding certain poses, you also build muscle strength, which, apart from promoting weight loss, increases mindful control over the body. This helps you feel more in control of your own life. In fact, according to a study, regularly practicing light yoga releases a calming chemical called GABA. This, over time, helps rewire the brain to have a less anxious response to daily stressors. 

#10. CONNECT WITH NATURE: 

There is growing research that being near the trees does wonder for your mental health. Exposure to calming nature sounds - yes, even silence - has been shown to lower blood pressure and cortisol, a stress hormone linked to negative thoughts and emotions. One recent study showed that as little as 20 minutes spent at a park can improve your outlook on life. 

#11. EAT SPICY FOODS: 

Peppers and spicy foods contain a compound called Capsaicin, which makes your brain think it’s in pain. As a response, your brain releases endorphins and dopamine. Someone eating a large amount of spicy food can experience a euphoria similar to "Runner’s High"

#12. PRACTICE GRATITUDE: 

Gratitude activates the brain’s reward system releasing feel-good chemicals. Some people keep a daily gratitude journal and write down things that they’re grateful for. Others engage in the ‘Three blessings exercise’, each evening focusing on three things to be grateful for. 

#13. MEDITATE: 

Taking the time to relax and focus the mind on meditating triggers the release of endorphins in the body. Meditation helps to increase other feel-good hormones including dopamine and serotonin, leaving you feeling uplifted with a more positive sense of wellbeing. Ensure you regularly take time out of your day to focus on mindfulness through meditation. This will have a significant effect on your physical health and your state of mind. 

#14. FIND WHAT YOU LOVE AND KEEP DOING IT: 

Having a sense of purpose, whether it’s the eagerness to discover new things in life or to pursue something you already like, increases the endorphins in your body. Look at what gives you joy; it could be singing, dancing, reading a good book, or even playing with your pet. Your endorphin levels also increase when you are around people you love. In fact, people often get addicted to high endorphin levels when they fall in love, as these go up naturally. 

#15. DARK CHOCOLATE: 

Research suggests that eating dark chocolate can stimulate the release of endorphins. This may be why it’s common to crave chocolate when you’re feeling low or stressed - your body knows it will make you feel better. The endorphin-boosting effect of chocolate is thought to be linked to the cocoa it contains. So if you’re looking for a mood boost, go for a bar that has at least 70% cocoa. And remember that chocolate has its downsides. It’s high in fat and sugar, so try to eat it in moderation. Apart from making you happy, dark chocolate has a wide range of other health benefits as well.

#16. GOSSIP: 

While giving to others is an altruistic way to increase endorphins, one of humanity’s less noble pursuits, gossip can do the same. While this might seem counterintuitive, both helping and gossiping are basic ways that humans connect with others. Apparently, gossiping is a primitive need that’s essential for our social and psychological well-being. And for better or for worse, electronic devices, the internet, and social media make it easier than ever to share gossip. 

#17. TAKE A LITTLE GINSENG: 

Ginseng may benefit people who are feeling fatigued and over-stressed or those recovering from a long illness. The herb can balance the release of stress hormones. It may also enhance the production of endorphins. Many long-distance runners and bodybuilders take ginseng to heighten physical endurance. Some doctors and herbalists believe that ginseng is able to delay fatigue because it enables muscles to use energy more efficiently. 

#18. TAKE A GROUP EXERCISE CLASS: 

Group exercise has some distinct advantages. Not only will friends spur you on if you’re lagging, but the shared effort may give your endorphin levels an extra boost. Researchers found that college crews who rowed in synchronization had an increased rush of these feel-good hormones compared with those who rowed alone. But all exercise is good, whether solitary or with others. Try walking, dancing,   aerobics, and running to transport yourself into a trance-like state. The rhythm of continuous exercise releases endorphins and encourages reflective thought. Exercising is one of the best ways to boost your endorphins and stay on top of your health. 

What would you prefer to boost your endorphin levels? Let us know in the comments section below! 

The information I provided in this blog is for educational purposes only and does not substitute for professional medical advice. You should never use content in my writing as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or another qualified clinician. Please consult a medical professional or healthcare provider if indicated for medical advice, diagnoses, or treatment. I am not liable for risks or issues associated with using or acting upon the information in this blog. Thank you.

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